Qualitative research

WHAT IS MY CUSTOMER REALLY THINKING? HOW ARE MY STAFF MEMBERS DOING? HOW CAN I MEET THE NEEDS OF MY CUSTOMERS, NOW AS WELL AS IN THE FUTURE?

Open feedback analysis

Is your company collecting customer feedback in a text format? Have you conducted a study that contains also open questions? Analysing open feedback may seem like a challenging and arduous task. The information is fragmented and it can be difficult to grasp the overarching themes among massive amounts of the collected data. However, open feedback includes suggestions for further development, along with indications of the customer’s current and future needs, and these may have significant commercial value to your company. Analysing the open feedback is essential so that the valuable information can be utilised in the decision-making process of your company. An analysis of the open answers can also create a foundation for implementing other more advanced analytical methods.

Studying the conscious mind

When ‘a subject’ – such as a consumer, customer or staff member – shares their own feelings and experiences in an individual or group interview, we are using what is known as a direct qualitative research method. The interview methods reveal currently concealed needs, opinions and experiences. The subject answers questions in full awareness and gives a personal account of their own feelings. This research method can be used, for example, when studying the customer or employee experience, the brand or the related images, as well as in the product development phase. Moreover, interviews can be carried out to complement surveys, as they can, for example, provide an even more in-depth insight into the already collected data. By using different techniques that deepen the subject’s involvement in the discussion, we can access the core reasons behind their behaviour, and the interview becomes more than just a descriptive story.

Studying the unconscious mind

Sometimes asking the subject directly is not the most reliable way of gathering information. Perhaps the subject is not able to express their opinions or wishes truthfully, but, instead, their answers reflect how they wish they were behaving or how they assume that the researcher would want them to behave. If the gathered information is distorted, it may lead to bad decisions. For this reason, we always tailor the best research method for each individual case. Indirect qualitative research methods – such as observational studies – are a good tool for gathering information on unconscious behaviour patterns and values. Our studies are always carried out in compliance with the ethical principles of research.

Turning emotions into data

As emotions can have substantially more impact on the purchase decisions of consumers – and also B2B buyers – than the technical or rational qualities of a product, it is important to study and understand the significance of emotions. It is also possible to study emotions with a quantitative survey.

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